Partners

  • 407 trained women entrepreneurs providing access to health products for approximately 525,120 people. By 2020, the goal is to train 1800 women who will serve over 4 million underserved Haitians
  • Boutik Sante (Little Health Stores) provide basic health supplies and services to some of the most impoverished, remote and rural areas of Haiti
  • These community health entrepreneurs (CHEs) receive training in basic health care screening and help in setting up a small health store that provides affordable health services and supplies
  • WE’s partnership with Fonkoze began in May, 2016
  • WE gave an initial contribution of $30,000 to be used for the training of the CHEs in 2016. WE raised an additional $4,270 for Hurricane Matthew disaster relief.

Photo Credit: Fonkoze USAPhoto Credit: Fonkoze USA

A Partnership with the International Rescue Committee, San Diego

  • 646 clients; 268 businesses started, and 303 unique businesses have been served
  • Provides entrepreneurial assistance, loans and grants to refugee and other low-income women in San Diego.
  • Provides workshop training in multiple languages in how to start an in-home childcare business, food-related business and other enterprises.
  • Created in 2006 as a partnership between WE and the International Rescue Committee, San Diego
  • 100 percent repayment rate
  • WE has contributed a total of almost $400,000

  • Serves 7,000 grannies caring for 43,000 AIDS orphans
  • Provides access to credit for income-generating activities to women caring for their orphaned grandchildren in and around the village of Nyaka in southwest Uganda
  • Women receive loans that are the equivalent of $4 to $40. The money helps them finance projects such as expanding their gardens to grow more vegetables for sale.
  • Also provides life-skills training, seeds and hoes, home improvements, and other assistance
  • WE’s partnership with Nyaka began January 2014
  • WE contributed $25,000 in 2014, and has set a fundraising goal of $32,000 for 2015.

  • Almost 2.100 borrowers in Choluteca and Intibucá, Honduras
  • Makes loans as small as $50 to the extremely poor in Honduras' rural villiages
  • Provides educational programs to borrowers and product innovation workshops
  • 97.3 percent repayment rate
  • Partnership with WE started in 2007
  • WE has contributed $140,000 to date

  • Two-phased pilot program called ESTIMA provides training and microloans to Tijuana female sex workers seeking to start alternative businesses.  
  • Research shows that economic vulnerability increases risk for HIV and gender-based violence among sex-workers.
  • Goals - Reduce or eliminate reliance on sex trade, improve health and well-being for themselves and their families.
  • Phase I, in process, provides $27,000 in microloans to 60 women to start their own businesses.  This phase is set for completion by the end of 2015.  Phase II, expected to initiate in early 2016, will provide business loans to 60 more female sex workers.
  • To participate, women must show strong motivation to improve their lives, be able to form positive relations with other women, maintain control of their own income and be free of drug or alcohol dependence.
  • Via’s training topics include savings, cash-flow, inventory, financial/legal documentation and insurance.
  • Examples of businesses expected to be started by loan clients include retail sales of clothing, shoes, make-up and other household goods; food, food carts, restaurants; services such as child care and cleaning.
  • The ESTIMA project is developed and evaluated by the UC San Diego Division of Global Public Health, Center on Gender Equity and Health.